Chef: Feel Good Personified

Film

Chef

Sometimes you come across a film that is quite simple just what it is on the surface of it, and that’s perfectly okay. In fact, it’s all the better for it. Chef is one of those films.

Chef tells the story of Carl Casper. Struggling with his family life. Not doing all that well in the work place either. Then makes a fool of himself on social media. Decides to get into the food truck business and drive it across America.

So few films that I see these days simply make me happy and contented. Chef is one of them. It’s just a nice film, which feels like a terrible thing to say. Labelling anything as nice feels like a kick in the nuts. But I don’t mean anything bad by it.

Chef

Hey, can you come swing by over here with that food truck?

I enjoyed Jon Favreau’s Carl Caspar who’s one true passion is food. I envied Carl Caspar a little bit, wishing I had a passion I felt as strongly about as Carl did. I bought into Carl’s less than great relationship with the son, Percy, who thinks the world of his father. No matter how much wrong Carl can sometimes do.

Again, I’m going to use one of those words I usually hate to use, especially when it comes to film, but this honestly is a heart-warming film. And it’s so proud of being that. Which is GREAT.

Chef

Chef left me wondering where exactly I could get a traditional Cuban sandwich in Bahrain. Answer? Nowhere!

At no point during Chef does the story deviate from it’s A to B course. There are no surprises. There are no twists. And yet, I’m completely happy with this. The film ended and I had that warm fuzzy feeling inside and a smile on my face.

(PS. Did Twitter somehow sponsor Chef? Twitter all over the shop! No mention of any other networks.)